Book Review Of “Where The Crawdads Sing” By Deia Owens @PutnamBooks @

Fans of Barbara Kingsolver will love this stunning debut novel from a New York Times bestselling nature writer, about an unforgettable young woman determined to make her way in the wilds of North Carolina, and the two men that will break her isolation open. 

For years, rumors of the “Marsh Girl” have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. She’s barefoot and wild; unfit for polite society. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark.

But Kya is not what they say. Abandoned at age ten, she has survived on her own in the marsh that she calls home. A born naturalist with just one day of school, she takes life lessons from the land, learning from the false signals of fireflies the real way of this world. But while she could have lived in solitude forever, the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. Drawn to two young men from town, who are each intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new and startling world–until the unthinkable happens.

In Where the Crawdads Sing, Owens juxtaposes an exquisite ode to the natural world against a heartbreaking coming of age story and a surprising murder investigation. Thought-provoking, wise, and deeply moving, Owens’s debut novel reminds us that we are forever shaped by the children we once were, and that we are all subject to the beautiful and violent secrets that nature keeps (From Goodreads) 

Thank you Putnam Books #Partner for gifting me a copy of this book in exchange of an honest review. All opinions are my own.

I rate this book a 5 out of 5 stars.

Everything about this book is going to be forever engrained in my memories. It was remarkable, and breathtaking, and everything I love about historical fiction, with some added mystery all rolled into one book. I love Kya, she was strong, and independent, and just wants love an acceptance just like everyone else in this world. She was a young lady who suffered a great deal at the hands of her mothers abandonment, and at the hands of her drunk father. This is a very emotional journey.

Owen’s paints a beautiful picture of the setting in North Carolina, its vivid, and descriptive, with a lush-ness that makes me want to pack up and drive there. North Carolina is one of the states I most want to visit, and after reading this, the desire is even more fierce. From the shack that Kya lives in, to her surrounding area, to the places the two young men show her. This was a beautiful journey in many ways.

This book also tackles some pretty difficult topics, such as abuse, racism, alcoholism, it’s emotional, it’s draining, and at times you are going to feel sad. But that’s a sign of a great book, one that can evoke several emotions. In my opinion anyway. I loved that this was a historical fiction novel, but it also had an element of mystery too it, by way of the murder. It was like two of my favorite genres mashed together. I am so glad I was sent this book to review. I cannot wait to read what Delia Owens comes up with next.

“Sometimes she heard night-sounds she didn’t know or jumped from lightning too close, but whenever she stumbled, it was the land who caught her. Until at last, at some unclaimed moment, the heart-pain seeped away like water into sand. Still there, but deep. Kya laid her hand upon the breathing, wet earth, and the marsh became her mother.”

This book comes out August 14th, I have included some helpful links below.

Add It On Goodreads Here

Buy On Amazon Here