Book Review Of “All The Ugly And Wonderful Things” By Bryn Greenwood

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A beautiful and provocative love story between two unlikely people and the hard-won relationship that elevates them above the Midwestern meth lab backdrop of their lives.

As the daughter of a drug dealer, Wavy knows not to trust people, not even her own parents. It’s safer to keep her mouth shut and stay out of sight. Struggling to raise her little brother, Donal, eight-year-old Wavy is the only responsible adult around. Obsessed with the constellations, she finds peace in the starry night sky above the fields behind her house, until one night her star-gazing causes an accident. After witnessing his motorcycle wreck, she forms an unusual friendship with one of her father’s thugs, Kellen, a tattooed ex-con with a heart of gold.

By the time Wavy is a teenager, her relationship with Kellen is the only tender thing in a brutal world of addicts and debauchery. When tragedy rips Wavy’s family apart, a well-meaning aunt steps in, and what is beautiful to Wavy looks ugly under the scrutiny of the outside world. (From Amazon)

Okay, This book gets a 4.5 out of 5 stars for me. I was and still am so torn on my feelings regarding Wavy and Kellen. It was a very sweet, nurturing relationship, that bordered Creepy and inappropriate. However by the time I reached the end of the story, I was full on rooting for Wavy and Kellen. (Once Wavy had reached adulthood). There was so much content in this book, and the story never lagged, it was under 350 pages, which is such a perfect length for a book in my opinion.

The things Wavy and her little brother Donal witnessed and had to go through was gut wrenching, I almost cried quite a few times while reading this book. Keep your tissue handy, and remember, even though there are parts of this book that can make you feel slightly uncomfortable, keep reading. This book is so well written, it deserves to be finished.  Also I want to add, there is a lot of sexual content, curse words, drug speak, abuse, and violence. So this could be a trigger book for you.

Your family is real, but mine isn’t? Real people with real feelings, but my family isn’t real to you. You think. I’m a character. A story. Those women you talk about. Not real people to you. Stupid women. I’m real. I’m as real as you are. My family is real like your family.”
Bryn Greenwood, All the Ugly and Wonderful Things