Book Review of “Blue Lily, Lily Blue” by Maggie Stiefvater

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Blue Sargent has found things. For the first time in her life, she has friends she can trust, a group to which she can belong. The Raven Boys have taken her in as one of their own. Their problems have become hers, and her problems have become theirs.

The trick with found things, though, is how easily they can be lost.

Friends can betray.

Mothers can disappear.

Visions can mislead.

Certainties can unravel. (from Amazon) I give this book a 4 out of 5 Stars. 

So, if you have been following my reviews on this series, you will know that I had a hard time getting into the first two books. Not the case with this one. I was pulled in, and my emotions were all over the place. There was a lot of heartache in this book. I didn’t see a couple of things coming, so when it happened, it was shocking. The end was incredible, and I loved the plot twists that came along with it.

I am starting to warm up a bit to Adam. But I still don’t 100% believe his intentions are pure. Still no over the top mushy love stuff, which I am enjoying immensely. I like the friendship, and the adoration, Blue and her “Raven Boys” have for each other, especially the heartwarming moments between Blue and Ronan. Im sure at some point in “The Raven King” the love story will come in to play. But how infrequently do you have to wait for the last book for the love story to start? Most books it’s within the first few chapters. So I really am enjoying this refreshing series. Funny, because what I love about this series, others actually dislike about it. So I guess I’m considered the unpopular opinion on this. Maybe.

I look forward to reading every book that Maggie writes, and I will be a forever fan of hers, just based on this series alone. Anyone agree with me?

“You can be just friends with people, you know,” Orla said. “I think it’s crazy how you’re in love with all those raven boys.”

Orla wasn’t wrong, of course. But what she didn’t realize about Blue and her boys was that they were all in love with one another. She was no less obsessed with them than they were with her, or one another, analyzing every conversation and gesture, drawing out every joke into a longer and longer running gag, spending each moment either with one another or thinking about when next they would be with one another. Blue was perfectly aware that it was possible to have a friendship that wasn’t all-encompassing, that wasn’t blinding, deafening, maddening, quickening. It was just that now that she’d had this kind, she didn’t want the other.”
Maggie Stiefvater, Blue Lily, Lily Blue